#Festivals of India

Know The Meaning And Significance Of Margashirsh Amavasya

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On December 14, Hindus in India will be celebrating the Margashirsh Amavasya. It is observed on the new moon day of Margashirsh month (November 22, 2020, to December 21, 2020) and has immense spiritual and religious significance. On this day, devotees worship Lord Krishna and Goddess Lakshmi.

How it is observed

Margashirsh Amavasya is significant partly because on this day devotees pay tribute to their ancestors by performing the ritual of Tarpanam. Pitru Dosh is caused by three ways- effects of the planet, the sins of the ancestors and one’s own Karma. Through this ritual, the devotees relive themselves of Pitru Dosh and seek forgiveness for any of their deeds that offended the ancestors. People observe a day-long fast on this day, visit temples, offer prayers to ancestors and wish for their blessings and peace. It is also common for the devotees to serve food to crows, who are considered to be the messengers of the ancestors or the ancestors themselves. Many devotees also take a holy dip in the nearby river and offer prayers for the peace and salvation of the ancestors.

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Apart from this ritual, some devotees conduct Satyanarayan Puja and Katha at home, devoted to Lord Vishnu. In the Hindu religion, every Amavasya (New Moon Day) has a religious and spiritual significance since it marks a new beginning, a new lunar month. Margashirsh Amavasya holds a greater value and considered to be favourable for weddings and other good deeds also. It is believed that devotees who observe this Amavasya are blessed with happiness and prosperity. Moreover, this day is religiously observed by couples who wish to have a child.

History Behind Marghashirsh Amavasya

Margashirsh Amavasya is a very auspicious day in Hindu Mythology because it was on this day that Lord Krishna gave Geetopadesham or lessons of Karma, war and life philosophy, recorded in Bhagvat Geeta, to Pandava Arjuna. Although there is no story or history behind the relevance of Tarpanam and worship of Goddess Lakshmi on this day.

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