Women Empowerment and Gender Parity seem to attract the attention of the world leaders, as they showcased support for women’s empowerment in the Women Political Leaders (WPL) Summit 2019 in Tokyo. The summit took place ahead of the G20 summit that is currently on-going in Osaka. Prime Minister of Japan Shinzo Abe renewed his attempt to empower women by saying, “societal change is possible if there is a clear vision coupled with concrete action.” He also added to his commitment by saying that he’ll ask the G20 Leaders to provide an additional four million young women with at least 12 years of high quality education and that he’s also committed to decreasing the gender gap in the workforce. He’s committed to decreasing the gap between men and women by 25 per cent by 2025. In the WPL, Nearly 400 people, mostly female political leaders participated from 87 countries. The participants gathered to discuss this year’s theme — ‘Taking action to advance society toward the U.N.’s Sustainable Development Goals’.

Women Empowerment and Gender Parity seem to attract the attention of the world leaders, as they showcased support for women’s empowerment in the Women Political Leaders (WPL) Summit 2019 in Tokyo.

Post this, the group of 20 leaders who are participating in the G20 Summit joined Abe in strengthening the position of women. The leaders showcased their support for women in closing the gap in finance and other fields.  Ivanka Trump, the advisor to Donald Trump, turned out to be in the spotlight with calls for women’s empowerment and equal rights globally. She spoke at the special session in the G20 Summit in Osaka, which also included her father, Donald Trump. She is also joined by Queen Maxima of the Netherlands.

Queen Maxima of the Netherlands, the UN secretary-general’s special advocate for inclusive finance for development, says “it is really necessary to close this gap for women to be economically empowered.” Some key points made at the special session, according to Washington Examiner are:

  • Global annual GDP could rise by an estimated $12 trillion by 2025 if women were allowed to “participate” in business like men.
  • Armed conflicts might drop, because more than 80% of the lowest-scoring countries in the Index for Gender Discrimination have experienced war in the last two decades.
  • Women in more than 100 countries still do not have equal rights to work, own land, get loans or run businesses. under the law, including opportunities to work in certain professions, purchase or inherit land, own businesses, or access capital.

Globally, it is estimated that 60 per cent of chronically hungry people are women and girls. Not only this, women also make up more than two thirds of the world’s 796 million illiterate people. According to global statistics, just 39 per cent of rural girls attend secondary school.

Globally, it is estimated that 60 per cent of chronically hungry people are women and girls. Not only this, women also make up more than two thirds of the world’s 796 million illiterate people. According to global statistics, just 39 per cent of rural girls attend secondary school. This is far fewer than rural boys (45 per cent), urban girls (59 per cent) and urban boys (60 per cent). Men’s average wages are higher than women’s in both rural and urban areas. Rural women typically work longer hours than men, due to additional reproductive, domestic and care responsibilities.

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