Advertisment

Why Glutamate In Protein Is Your Skin Defence?

Both glutamate and another amino acid, named proline, play pivotal roles in collagen production within your skin. A diet lacking in these essential amino acids can lead to dull and lifeless skin. 

author-image
STP Reporter
New Update
skin women's health | Image from iStock photo

Image from iStock photo

It is one vital amino acid that your body requires from your dietary intake. It's one of those essential jigsaw pieces in the grand puzzle called 'your overall health', especially when it comes to your skin's well-being. Another way of putting it. Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter with several types of receptors found throughout the central nervous system, and its metabolism is important to maintaining optimal levels within the extracellular space. As such, it is important for memory, cognition, and mood regulation.

Advertisment

The problem at hand

Protein deficiency is more common in women than in men. Protein deficiency can lead to skin problems such as dermatitis, which affects 31.6 million people in the US alone. Up to 50% of surgical patients are protein malnourished, leading to potential skin complications. 

The pivotal role of protein

Both glutamate and another amino acid, named proline, play pivotal roles in collagen production within your skin. Collagen, as you might already know, is the bedrock of your skin structure, giving it elasticity and resilience. A diet lacking in these essential amino acids can lead to dull and lifeless skin, and in the longer run, may contribute to premature skin aging. 

With simple awareness of its intricate workings, glutamate stands as a potent tool for enhancing the overall health and wellbeing of the populace. It has been shown that natural activities such as physical exercise and mindfulness exercises can greatly boost levels of glutamate and GABA without the need for pharmaceutical intervention.

Ever wondered how your genes could be influenced by your diet? Welcome to the fascinating world of epigenetics. This biological principle suggests our gene expressions can indeed be altered by dietary and environmental factors. This means what you eat, including proteins and amino acids, can directly affect how your genes play out their role in maintaining your skin health. 

Advertisment

Then, there's the major concern of diabetes. A protein deficit in your body could potentially escalate diabetes symptoms, and diabetes, in turn, can play havoc with your skin condition, triggering problems like dryness, infections, and slow wound healing. In this context, an adequate protein intake from your diet could be a potential game-changer. 

Diverting the attention towards dietary sources, foods like red grapes and broccoli are excellent sources of glutamate. Incorporating such ingredients into your dietary regime can provide a double boon of supplying essential protein and a host of other valuable nutrients. When you are looking towards adequate consumption of protein, opt for supplements that are built on vegan or plant protein base.

Protein, as we can see, is crucial for almost every structure in your body - your skin included. So next time you plan your diet, remember to not just eat a meal but build a healthier you, one protein-fueled food choice at a time.

Glutamate skin health
Advertisment