On August 31, Women Writers Fest by SheThePeople.TV was conducted in Bengaluru.  The theme of the fest was: The city, the people, the readers, the writers, the performances. The first discussion was on “How green was our city: Bengaluru”. The panellists of the discussion were: Harini Nagendra Seema Mundoli Manasi Kumar MB Rajani Bijal Vachharajani and Jhelum Biswas Bose.

As the topic suggests, the first panel focused on how the green city Bengaluru is changing its course with modernisation, developments and pollution. With the increased population and productivity, technology is taking over the natural surrounding that caressed our fast-moving lives. We are only left with ample devices and reminisce of the greeneries Bengaluru was once known for. So the first panel discussion was on ‘How green was our city: Bengaluru’ to reminisce on a wider platform, moderated by Mahalakshmi Prabhakaran.

The panellists mainly talked about how Bangalore is a green city before and why it is important to preserve the greenery of the city.

“The debate on the environment is probably a debate we should have had earlier. Now we need to have an environment if we want to even exist. By 2030 we might not have a planet to live on. We need to get rid of this dichotomy and change our thinking quite massively. We cannot go tweaking I will plant one tree or open a nursery. We really need to change the way we look at nature which is very integral to our living.”

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The beauty of Bengaluru

With the relish of fragrance and purity of the green city, Jhelum Biswas Bose said, “I have always been drawn to flowers. There are flowers in Bengaluru and lots of greenery around me. I am blessed to have a garden in front of my apartment. I literally feel like I am living in a fairyland.”

Seema Mundoli also added to the captivating beauty of Bengaluru by expressing her own experience. She said, “Every place of the city is special to me. Good to settle in Bengaluru with so many trees. The city is greener than other places.” To this Harini Nagendra also added that she can never imagine to leave the city and live in some other place.

Backing the magnificent beauty of Bengaluru with a historical foundation, Rajni added, “Bengaluru was a naked land. It was barren. The trees we have were planted later by the director. The soil is very fertile.”

The changing environment of Bangalore

After a series of reminiscing and admiration of the green city of India, the discussion gradually shifted towards the idea that the greenery has deteriorated. With the modernity and the requirements of advanced technology, no doubt the green city is also the silicon valley of India. But the growing technicalities of the city, the former greenery are gradually being succumbed. Deforestation, pollution, tall and manifold buildings among others are barricading and affecting the beauty and growth of the green city. It will not be less than a nightmare to lose the green city to the silicon valley of India. Both the environment and technology are important for sustainable living. They complement each other and advance the lifestyle in a fresh and fragrant environment. The loss of one will lead to an excess of the other and excessive technologies will directly affect human life before anything else. Therefore, it is important, not only in Bengaluru but all over India, to initiate debates and appropriate actions to preserve the environment before it is too late.

Talking about the environmental debates, Seema Mundoli said, “The debate on the environment is probably a debate we should have had earlier. Now we need to have an environment if we want to even exist. By 2030 we might not have a planet to live on. We need to get rid of this dichotomy and change our thinking quite massively. We cannot go tweaking I will plant one tree or open a nursery. We really need to change the way we look at nature which is very integral to our living.”

Extending further the difference of verbal and real actions on preserving the environment, Manasi Kumar spoke about the role of social media in thickening the difference. She said, “Social media allows people to become armchair activists. This is a double-edged sword. People need to come down for real work when required.”

“Social media allows people to become armchair activists. This is a double-edged sword. People need to come down for real work when required.”

The significance of a discussion

Apart from the theoretical discussions on what actions are needed to be done, the panellists also appreciated the practicality of the discussion as a whole. Bijal Vachharajani said “We need to be mindful and aware of what we say and do. When we start a conversation after our awareness with ten people, the ten people will talk to others. This is how things will change.”

Rudrani Kumari is an intern with SheThePeople.TV

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