Advertisment

Impact Of Perimenopause On Sleep Cycle: What Every Woman Should Know

The transitional phase leading up to menopause can significantly impact a woman's sleep patterns. This is primarily due to fluctuating hormone levels, particularly estrogen and progesterone, which play a crucial role in regulating sleep

author-image
STP Reporter
Updated On
New Update
menopause

The transitional phase leading up to menopause can significantly impact a woman's sleep patterns. This is primarily due to fluctuating hormone levels, particularly estrogen and progesterone, which play a crucial role in regulating sleep. Estrogen, which decreases during perimenopause, has a significant impact on the body's ability to reach and maintain the deeper, restorative stages of sleep. As levels of this hormone decline, women may experience lighter, more fragmented sleep, often leading to feelings of fatigue and sleepiness during the day.

Advertisment

Progesterone, another hormone that decreases during perimenopause, has natural sedative properties and promotes REM sleep. Lower levels of progesterone can lead to difficulties falling asleep and maintaining sleep, contributing to insomnia.

Hot flashes and night sweats, common symptoms of perimenopause, can also disrupt sleep. These symptoms can cause women to wake up frequently throughout the night, leading to a decrease in sleep quality and duration.

Sleep disturbances during perimenopause can also exacerbate mood disorders, such as anxiety and depression, which in turn can further disrupt sleep, creating a vicious cycle.

Poor sleep quality and sleep disturbance are lesser-known changes during this phase of life, says Grace Pien, M.D., M.S.C.E., an assistant professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins Sleep Disorders Center, but they’re very common.

The Impact of Hormones on Sleep 

During perimenopause, the production of two key hormones, estrogen and progesterone, begin to fluctuate. These hormones play a crucial role in promoting sleep. Thus, their imbalance can lead to sleep disturbances.

Advertisment

The Role of Estrogen and Progesterone 

The estrogen hormone not only helps to regulate the menstrual cycle, but it also promotes healthy sleep. As perimenopause approaches, your body begins to produce less estrogen. This decline can disrupt your sleep in several ways. 

The Link Between Perimenopause and Sleep

There's a strong connection between your hormonal health and the quality of your sleep. When estrogen levels begin to decline during perimenopause, this can lead to several sleep disturbances. Here's how this plays out:

Hot Flashes: These sudden feelings of warmth, which are often followed by heavy sweating and a cold shiver, are common symptoms of perimenopause. They can occur at any time but are particularly disruptive when they happen at night, causing frequent wake-ups and making it difficult to get a good night's sleep.



Insomnia: With less estrogen, the body may produce fewer endorphins, or "feel good" hormones. Less of these can lead to feelings of anxiety and depression, which can cause insomnia.



Night Sweats: These are similar to hot flashes but occur specifically during sleep. The severity of night sweats can range from mild to severe enough to soak your sleepwear or bedding, resulting in interrupted sleep.



The Impact of Poor Sleep

Lack of quality sleep isn't just about feeling tired. Poor sleep can affect every aspect of your health and well-being. From reduced cognitive function and mood swings to weakened immunity, the impact can be profound. 

Advertisment

Remember, it's never too early to start addressing your sleep needs. Understanding the potential impact of perimenopause on your sleep can help you take steps to mitigate its effects. Don't hesitate to talk to your healthcare provider if you're experiencing sleep disturbances. Check out Gytree's programs for menopause

Perimenopause can be a challenging time, but with proper self-care and medical guidance, you can navigate this natural phase of life in a healthy, proactive way.

Many women experience sleep problems during perimenopause, the time before menopause when hormone levels and menstrual periods become irregular. Often, poor sleep sticks around throughout the menopausal transition and after menopause. Fortunately, says Pien, there’s help.

Perimenopause on Sleep Cycles Perimenopause
Advertisment