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Schools teach us everything we need to know. From making our future bright to being a responsible citizen as well as a human being, it all starts from the school. But when it comes to sex education, why do we lag behind? Actually, we live in a country where condom ads are banned instead of decreasing the level of vulgarity in advertisements. We feel so hesitant in discussing sex, the precautions and complications. Sex education is therefore the need of the hour.

Why Sex Education?

“Firstly, sex education needs to be taught in schools as sexuality is normal and is an integral part of overall child development.  Many people, including caregivers, hesitate to talk about sex and sexuality, given the existing culture of silence. Whether schools or caregivers decide to teach it or not, children are bombarded with  sexual content that are often distorted, misrepresented and create a faulty, unrealistic understanding of sexuality in young minds. On the other hand, a structured sex education curriculum has the potential to teach children about positive sexuality, harm prevention, sexual and reproductive health, being assertive, intimacy and respecting their own and others’ personal boundaries and shaping their identity,” says Dr Manjeer Mukherjee, senior advisor, Arpan NGO.

In the era where even a 10-year-old child can easily access the content on internet, it is very necessary to teach them the difference between right and wrong. Not only this, both girls and boys need to be taught about the good and bad in everything. Because not only girls, even boys are falling prey to sexual predators.

How Sex Education Needs To Be Taught At The School Level

The word ‘Sex’ is enough to create a sense of uncomfortable awkwardness in a group. This is one of the reasons why sex education is not taken seriously. I still remember the fuss created in class when the chapter “Reaching The Age Of Adolescence” was being taught. “An effective sex education curriculum needs to be conducted in a single-gender class, having participatory pedagogical approaches with teachers who are trained and comfortable with the topic and the content which is researched, piloted and vetted. The programme should involve parents and school staff,” adds Dr Mukherjee.

Whether schools or caregivers decide to teach it or not, children are bombarded with  sexual content that are often distorted, misrepresented and create a faulty, unrealistic understanding of sexuality in young minds

Here are some ways that can make sex education in schools more effective:

  • Including Teachers Who Are Comfortable With The Topic

Most of the times, it is seen that teachers themselves are not comfortable with teaching the topic. This makes it even more difficult to continue the subject. Keeping in view the sensitivity of the topic, the teacher should be comfortable as well as efficient enough to tackle questions of the students while teaching the topic.

  • Single Gender Classes

It becomes difficult for both girls and boys to indulge in such topics when they are both in the same class. It often becomes a matter of joke. So to carry out the topic efficiently and to meet the reason behind it, it is important that the lessons are carried out in a single gender classes.

  • Applying Participatory Approaches In Teaching

Methods that involve students in the lessons being taught should be applied. The lessons should be taught in a way that seem interesting to the students.

  • Involving Parents

Since sex education forms a very important part of our lives, involving parents in it would contribute to the purpose. Following the inquisitive attitude of the children today, they can discuss their confusions easily with their parents.

Sex education not only helps a person in maintaining one’s own sexual health, but also in keeping an eye on sexual predators. It is very important and should be taught at the school level itself so that the person knows it all from the beginning itself.

Read More: Sex Education – The Show I Wish To Have Watched As A Teenager

Anushika Srivastava is an Intern with SheThePeople.Tv

Email us at connect@shethepeople.tv