The Pizol Glacier in Switzerland has completely disappeared due to global warming. The Swiss people have commemorated the loss through a memorial service in the Alps. The “funeral march” of the Pizol Glacier was carried out on Sunday where people took part in large numbers.

According to the scientists, since 2006, the glacier has lost at least 80% of its volume. Accelerated rise of global temperatures is the reason behind the disappearance of the glacier according to scientists.

A study by the researchers in Switzerland confirms that, by the year 2050, at least half of Switzerland’s glaciers could vanish.

Key Takeaways:

  • The Pizol Glacier in Switzerland has completely disappeared due to global warming. 
  • According to the scientists, since 2006, the glacier has lost at least 80% of its volume. The reason scientists have cited for the disappearance for the glacier is the accelerated rise of global temperatures.
  • A study by the researchers in Switzerland confirms that, by the year 2050, at least half of Switzerland’s glaciers could vanish.
  • The “funeral march” event was organised by the Swiss Association for Climate Protection (SACP). 

Alessandra Degiacomi, a Swiss climate campaigner, told the AFP news agency that the Pizol glacier has reduced to an extent that from a scientific perspective it’s not even considered a glacier anymore.

Pizol Glacier Swiss Alps
Activists at the memorial march, Image credit: Newsy Today

The glacier, which has reduced to just a few frozen lumps was to be declared dead at the ceremony, said Imogen Foulkes, the BBC’s Geneva correspondent.

The “funeral march” event was organised by the Swiss Association for Climate Protection (SACP). The Swiss Association for Climate Protection is an initiative that calls for the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions in Switzerland to zero by 2050.

The “funeral march” event was organised by the Swiss Association for Climate Protection (SACP). The Swiss Association for Climate Protection is an initiative that calls for the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions in Switzerland to zero by 2050.

Read also: Indian Students Join Global Climate Strike, Protests To Culminate Sept 27

Greta Thunberg’s initiative for Climate 

Ahead of the UN summit, Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg inspired people from the entire world to go on an environmental strike. Thunberg encouraged protesters across the continents who responded to her and came out in huge numbers and waved placards and chanted slogans. The strike can be called the biggest ever demonstration over the issue of global warming caused by humans.

The teenage activist emerged like a champion at the rally while people chanted, “Greta! Greta!” around New York’s Battery Park.

Pizol Glacier Swiss Alps
A huge crowd gathered at the event, Image credit: Deccan Chronicle

“This is the biggest climate strike ever in history, and we all should be so proud of ourselves because we have done this together,” Thunberg told the demonstrators. She said that about four million people around the world took part in the environmental strike.

“This is an emergency. Our house is on fire. And it’s not just the young people’s house, we all live here – it affects all of us,” she told the crowd.

“This is an emergency. Our house is on fire. And it’s not just the young people’s house, we all live here – it affects all of us,” she told the crowd.

UN Climate Action Summit

To meet the climate challenge, the United Nations Secretary-General, António Guterres, hosted the 2019 Climate Action Summit on September 23, 2019. The summit was held in response to the Paris Agreement on Climate Change. It aimed to showcase a leap in the collective national political ambition.

Image credit: weather.com

Read also: How Dare You? Greta Thunberg Makes Emotional Speech At UN

Udisha Srivastav is an intern with SheThePeople.TV

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