“A mother has seen all those phases and knows the challenges that her daughter will face as well as the potential that her daughter has. That is what makes a mother, her daughter’s best friend – she chooses to give guidance and not advice,” says Simran Oberoi Multani, Founder of Ovenderful on what makes a mother her daughter’s best friend.

Think about it. Mothers have seen you go through all – from a young girl fretting over homework to a grown-up girl heading to college, from struggling with doing your own work to help others overcome their challenges. She understands us better than we understand ourselves.

This Friendship Day, we chose to speak to some women on what makes their mothers or daughters their best friends.

 Finding a companion in daughter

Talking about the strong bond Author Shuchi Singh Kalra shares with her seven-year-old daughter, she says, “More than a mother, I strive to be a friend to my daughter because I want her to grow up knowing that there is at least one person she can always fall back on, no matter where life leads her.”

Shuchi believes in strengthening the buddy aspect of her motherdaughter bond and remove any communication barriers. She, however, doesn’t hold back from exercising her authority whenever the situation demands.

Kalra reveals how they go out for lunch dates and have engaging conversations about everything under the sun.

“I am glad that she doesn’t feel the need to filter her thoughts while sharing them with me.” – Shuchi Singh Kalra

A continuously evolving relationship

Deepshikha Chakravarti, working as an editor with a media agency, says, “As we grow up, our mother is the witness to a lot of our “firsts” in life and also privy to many failures. So, it is obvious that she becomes our biggest support and confidante and over the years our friend. Also, as women in India, every mother has a tale of umpteen sacrifices she has made in life and the daughter is a silent witness to it. Therefore, there is an understanding and a comfort in a mother-daughter relationship like no other. ”

Kusha Kalra, Founder of HappyLives, says that her friendship has evolved with her mother in the last five or six years. “It has reached a stage now where I feel I am her caretaker, caregiver, her partner and also each other’s sounding board. From gossiping about her kitty friends (calling her bhabhiji) to now talking about each other’s life partner issues (yes, we do gossip about tantrums, my dad throws around), we have certainly come a long way! ”

Learnings from Their Mothers – Millennials speak

About What Got Them Closer

Simran Oberoi tells SheThePeople.TV that her friendship with her mother cemented when she was moving away from home to another city for the first time to study in a business school.

“While we were living in separate cities for the first time, I felt closer to her because the interactions and what I was sharing with her was more meaningful and had gone beyond telling her what happened in school or college. I was sharing what was happening in life,” she shared.

Kusha Kalra recalls, “She stood for me even after I had breakups with my ex-husband and made me her valentine! That day I realised that the only one who gives and therefore deserves love unconditionally is my mum!!”

AlsoRead: These 25 Powerful Quotes about Motherhood Are An Inspiration for All

Get the best of SheThePeople delivered to your inbox - subscribe to Our Power Breakfast Newsletter. Follow us on Twitter , Instagram , Facebook and on YouTube, and stay in the know of women who are standing up, speaking out, and leading change.