Jocinda Ardern, the new leader of New Zealand’s Labour party, gave it back to her interviewers who repeatedly asked her whether she was planning on having any children if she became Prime Minister.

The first time she was asked the question, she said that she has been “really open about that dilemma because I think probably lots of women face it”.

“For me, my position is no different to the woman who works three jobs, or who might be in a position where they are juggling lots of responsibilities,” Ardern said.

But then radio interviewer Mark Richardson became aggressive. He asked, “Is it OK for a PM to take maternity leave while in office?”

He also said that the public “need to know that type of thing from the women you are employing”.

Ardern took offence at this. She said that it was totally unacceptable in 2017 to ask questions like this. “For other women, it is totally unacceptable in 2017 to say that women should have to answer that question in the workplace,” said Ardern.

“That is unacceptable in 2017. It is the woman’s decision about when they choose to have children.”

New Zealand’s Prime Minister Bill English also said that this matter is entirely Ardern’s business. He also said that politics is tough on families, it’s tough on relationships.

Ardern had joined as the Labour party’s leader just a few hours before the incident happened. She is the youngest person to hold the job, and also only the second woman. What is ironic is that it is illegal for employers in New Zealand to ask job candidates whether they’re pregnant or considering having children.

It’s time men stopped asking women these kinds of questions about their work and families! Men are certainly not asked these questions.

Also Read: Now, 180 Days Maternity Leave To Working Pregnant Women In Uttarakhand

Picture Credit: Reuters

Get the best of SheThePeople delivered to your inbox - subscribe to Our Power Breakfast Newsletter. Follow us on Twitter , Instagram , Facebook and on YouTube, and stay in the know of women who are standing up, speaking out, and leading change.