As the world observes Mental Health Day today, there’s a shocking revelation about the mental health of around 10 crore Indians. It has been confirmed by the World Health Organization that 7.5 percent of Indians, which amounts to approximately 10 crore Indians, suffer from mental health issues. Anxiety and Depression form the most common mental health issues.

Key Takeaways:

  • Out of India’s total population of 135 crore people, 7.5 percent, which is equal to around 10 crore Indians who suffer from mental health issues, according to the World Health Organization.
  • By 2020, the number of people who suffer from mental health issues is expected to increase to 20 percent.
  • India also accounts for nearly 15 percent of the global mental, neurological and substance abuse disorder burden in the world.
  • Mental illness is also the reason for the rising number of suicides.
  • According to WHO, 2.2 lakh lives are lost to suicide in India every year, a rate of 16.3 deaths per 100,000 people.
  • Also, there are fewer than 4000 medical professionals to cater to the needed assistance in case of mental illness. 

Read More: We Must Start Taking Mental Health Issues Seriously: Shwetha Bhatia

Indians Tend To Deny The Presence Of Mental Health Issues

The people associated with the findings blame the tradition of denial when it comes to mental health issues among Indians for the increasing number of suicides. “We live in an era where you have to be number one, no matter what! No one really cares about the mental health of a student. Everyone wants us to perform well, but no one wants to think about what if we don’t perform well? What if we fail? The ‘what if I fail’ concern is borne by the students alone, and to some extent, this does hamper our mental health. But no one accepts it. Mental illness is often perceived as the sign of a loser, and that’s why many of us think for like a zillion times before accepting that we are actually depressed. Depression is real, and it should be figured out before it is too late.” says Somya Jaiswal, a student at CSJM University, Kanpur.

India also accounts for nearly 15 percent of the global mental, neurological and substance abuse disorder burden in the world.

“Depression is dangerous. But a person doesn’t dive directly into depression. There are stages through which one goes before actually being depressed. According to me, a person first loses confidence in oneself. As we, the students are concerned, we are vulnerable to mental health issues to a much greater extent I feel. There is so much competition all around. Plus we aren’t taught about how to accept failures, because we are only expected to pass with flying colors. Sometimes, we just need someone to tell us, that no matter what, none of the competitions are more important than our mental health, than our own lives. But sadly, very few of us have the privilege of being calmed by these words.” says Saloni Srivastava, a student at the CSJM University, Kanpur

India Accounts For Nearly 15 percent Of The Global Mental, Neurological And Substance Abuse Disorder Burden

According to the same WHO report, India also accounts for nearly 15 percent of the global mental, neurological and substance abuse disorder burden in the world. Moreover, other surprising statistics point towards the very little number of mental health professionals available to cater to the needed assistance. Therefore, it is needed that the way we are affected by physical illness, the same importance should also be given to mental health too.

Picture Credit: Roar.Lk

Read More: Why Is It A Taboo To Quit, For The Sake Of Mental Well-Being

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