Two of the biggest fashion firms in the world, LVMH and Kering, have said that they will no longer use models who are below a French size 32, which is UK size 6 or US size 0. The firms will also not use models who are younger than 16 to model for adult clothes.

Kering’s chairman Francois-Henri Pinault said the firms hope to inspire the entire industry to follow suit. The two companies own most of the top fashion brands in the world, including Gucci, Christian Dior, Louis Vuitton, Stella McCartney, Givenchy, Alexander McQueen, and many others.

Shoddy treatment

Brands have been criticised by the way they employ models. Louis Vuitton was in the news in May after it allegedly forced Danish model Ulrikke Hoyer to starve herself in the run up to a show. Balenciaga also fired two casting directors in March, after they left 150 models cramped in a dark stairwell for hours without food.

The decision by these two firms comes after France passed a law in May banning ultra thin models. Anyone who breaks the law has to pay a fine. Models must also present valid medial certificates stating that they are fit to work

The director of LVMH, Antoine Arnault, said, “I am deeply committed to ensuring that the working relationship between LVMH Group brands, agencies and models goes beyond simply complying with the legal requirements.”

He said that it will make models’ lives easier and less frightening.

The two brands had collective sales of 50 billion pounds in 2016.

This is big news for the fashion industry, which has been known to place unrealistic expectations on women. Hopefully this does inspire a new wave of body positivity and an increasing acceptance of the diversity of women’s bodies. Other brands take note — it is no longer fashionable to be ultra skinny!

Also Read: France Bans Ultra Skinny Fashion Models

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