In a landmark decision, the professional women soccer players from Australia will receive the same minimum wage as their male counterparts. They are offered to be given the same base pay as men in a one-year extension, Reuters reported. Under a new collective bargaining agreement unveiled, players in Australia’s W-League are announced to have their annual minimum remuneration hiked to 33 percent which will amount to A$16,344 ($11,400).  With this renewed pay check their base hourly rate is expected to matching the men’s A-League, Football Federation Australia and the players union said on Friday.

“We’re very proud that we have been able to anchor the minimum conditions for W-League players to those of A-League players,” Professional Footballers Australia CEO John Didulica said in a statement. “It’s a moment in time that the players should be proud of,” Didulica added.

“We’re very proud that we have been able to anchor the minimum conditions for W-League players to those of A-League players,” Professional Footballers Australia CEO John Didulica said in a statement.

It is believed that this new wage hike will maximise the process of reducing the gender pay gap in Australian football. Male players earn significantly more due to their double time on the pitch. The announcement comes days after the PFA launched a campaign demanding global governing body FIFA increase prize money at the upcoming women’s World Cup. This move is to reduce the rampant pay gap with the men’s tournament.

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Football Federation Australia hailed the move as “an outcome that delivers on the gender equity principle of ‘same base pay for same base work.’” The deal means that players in both leagues “will receive the same minimum remuneration hourly rate”, said FFA Head of Leagues Greg O’Rourke, Sportstar reported.

Gender pay disparity in football has always been a burning topic to discuss but the real spotlight was given in March when the U.S. women’s team sued their national federation for alleged gender discrimination three months before their World Cup title defence.

Gender pay disparity in football has always been a burning topic to discuss but the real spotlight was given in March when the U.S. women’s team sued their national federation for alleged gender discrimination three months before their World Cup title defence. In 2017, Australia’s contracted women cricketers were given the same base hourly pay rate as men in a five-year collective bargaining agreement.

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