Aditi Aggarwal remembers herself as a shy, reserved kid. Every time there was a social gathering at her place, she used to go to a small study room in her house and start creating little crafty stuff with her hands. When the guests would be leaving, she used to present her little creations to them. In return, she would have many compliments and praises coming her way. That initial encouragement bolstered her confidence to try to make it as an artist.

Aggarwal has pursued her bachelors and masters from College Of Art, University of Delhi and she was awarded a gold medal for her MFA. A recipient of the HRD National Scholarship, Ministry of Culture & Camel Art Foundation Award, she had her first solo art exhibition last year.

Recently, she was part of the exhibition Inbound, which also featured the works of artists Aban Raza and Megha Madan.

 To her, an artwork requires reflection on past experience and a sifting of emotions and meanings from that prior experience. She say’s her work is autobiographical. So, her experiences, observations, reflections, memories, feelings etc. are all reflected in her work in various ways.

“I enjoy working in a book format. The books/sketchbooks to me are small intimate spaces, one that I would like to keep to myself.”

“I enjoy working in a book format. The books/sketchbooks to me are small intimate spaces, one that I would like to keep to myself. Sometimes I call it a diary where I jot down my thoughts in lines and shapes, texts, colours etc very instinctively. These are never smaller modules or first drafts of the larger works I make.”
Her recent series Mindscapes explore and delve into the idea of repetition and spontaneity. So, she has played with layers in her paintings and they are devoid of any preconceived notion or deliberation.
Aditi Aggwarwal
PC: Aditi Aggwarwal
She informs, “While painting, I sometimes de-structure the image into several layers to see the possibilities in juxtapositions and separations. To me, it is very necessary that the visual should be unified. The course of painting itself gives birth to forms and thereafter dictating dimensional spaces, bringing the surface alive with movement and life. I aim at creating visuals resonating with energy; evolve as a personal mapping of my working process.”
 
As an artist, one of the hurdles she at times faces is that of funding. Aggarwal feels that the government should make more effort to support artistic practices.  Because whether it is experimenting or honing a craft, the time and resources is always an underlying factor for one and all.

“I have found Delhi to be very competitive and encouraging at the same time, which indeed helps me to grow as an individual and as an artist”

“As a young female artist practicing in New Delhi NCR region, I have found the region very competitive and encouraging at the same time, which indeed helps me to grow as an individual and as an artist,” she adds.

People, conversations, and her immediate environment shape her work. Staying in a city, which is buzzing with great art is also a source of inspiration for her. The artist who looks up to the likes of Raja Ravi Verma, Amrita Shergil, and Bose Krishnamachari among others wishes to pursue a PhD in Fine Arts in the coming years. She also hopes to create more ambitious works of art and exhibit in some of the best galleries.

She concludes with a quote by Andy Warhol, as an advice to young artists,

“Don’t think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it’s good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.”

 Also Read: Artist Aban Raza On Why And How Her Work Mirrors Human Realities

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