Lingerie brand Figleaves has released its new campaign featuring images which are completely devoid of airbrushing. In a daring move, the new Figleaves campaign celebrates fat rolls, stretch marks and sagging skin, reports Independent. But that’s not it, the UK brand’s campaign also boasts a diverse line of models and is titled “Confidence looks great on you”.

In times when women are struggling with body image issues courtesy Photoshop, airbrush and filters which are freely available as apps, Figleaves’ move will hopefully motivate women to embrace their bodies as they are

Nothing is superior to your natural self

When an average woman sees an ad campaign for lingerie or any fashion brand, what she mostly sees is perfection. Perfect models with their perfect figure and flawless skin. No blemishes, no wrinkles, no love handles and not one silvery stretch mark. It feels artificial and made-up. And yet somehow it ends up leaving an indelible mark on her conscience, of what an ideal woman’s body is supposed to be like.

SOME TAKEAWAYS-

  • Lingerie brand Figleaves’ new ad campaign features images of models sans airbrushing.
  • When an average woman sees an ad campaign for lingerie or any fashion brand, what she mostly sees is perfection.
  • It ends up leaving an indelible mark on her conscience, of what an ideal woman’s body is supposed to be like.
  • Love handles, stretch marks, sagging skin and dry patches, etc, are all natural and commonplace. Hence they need to be embraced by everyone, including brands and fashion magazines.

You have to remember that this is not about being fit or fat or thin. This is a different kind of body shaming which women face, irrespective of their weight or body type. Because a perfect body type eludes most of us. So does this mean that we are all imperfect? That we must all feel inferior for not matching the bodily standards we see on magazine covers and ad campaigns? Or do we need to change our definition of bodily perfection?

Love handles, stretch marks, dry patches, etc, are all natural and commonplace. We all have them and choose to live in denial of their existence. Today we are able to trim out the bulges in our tummies and crease out our stretch marks via photoshopping. But does that mean they do not exist?

These so-called imperfections are what make us human and unique. Ridding ourselves of them would only make us more artificial and plastic like

That women choose to revere plasticity over natural beauty is proof how impactful magazine covers and ad campaigns are. Artificial beauty has been glamourized to such an extent that today there are few takers for a natural physique. It doesn’t just affect women’s confidence, but it also stereotypes beauty.

For men, a beautiful woman is one who is flawless. Just like young girls, boys grow up looking up at photoshopped women, co-relating feminine beauty to perfect skin and figure. It eventually ends up objectifying women in their gaze. It makes them look at “normal” or “flawed” women as ugly.

We need more brands and magazines to give up airbrushing, to save a generation of women from feeling insecure and inferior

Those photoshopped images of women on posters and covers, they are not us. They do no represent who or what or how we are. Then why do they get to endorse products we use or represent us in public spaces? Figleaves has embraced female form in all its natural glory and their move should inspire other brands to follow suit. Choose natural over airbrushed bodies. Selling a product shouldn’t come at the cost of a woman’s confidence or belief in her unique and natural self.

Picture Credit: Samuel Zeller, Unsplash

Also read: Dear Beauty Pageants, Indian Women Are Diversely Beautiful

Yamini Pustake Bhalerao is a writer with the SheThePeople team, in the Opinions section.  The views expressed are author’s own.

Get the best of SheThePeople delivered to your inbox - subscribe to Our Power Breakfast Newsletter. Follow us on Twitter , Instagram , Facebook and on YouTube, and stay in the know of women who are standing up, speaking out, and leading change.