Veidehi Gite, popularly known as the Krazy Butterfly is a passionate travel, lifestyle and food blogger. She spoke to us at the Digital Women Awards 2019 about her journey till now. We asked her about the effect of technology on her journey and how her big idea came about. Here is what she says:

How did your big idea strike you? 

I decided to quit my corporate career in 2016 to travel the world and broaden my horizon. However, before travelling I did massive research on the locations I was visiting and it struck me that how important it was to pen down first-hand experiences to make life easy for other travellers. Luxury Travel piqued my interest and made me really happy so I began to document it even though it was an unconventional niche in India at the time. However, it does fetch boatload of money considering you are investing your time in the brands that value your efforts, as much as, they would like to be appreciated by their consumers.

Having faith in yourself is just as important, as having enough savings to be able to invest in your business until the returns begin to show up.

How has tech and digital been an enabler in your entrepreneurship journey? 

Blogging and documenting luxury travel is mostly dependent on the digital audience. Digitally active people create higher conversion by opting for e-commerce facilities. All the more with regards to the luxury segment, as the consumers have definite preferences. Be it hotels, consumer goods or luxury goods, these people prefer to shop online to maximise their time and efficiency. Besides, almost every other luxury brand has an online presence and offers online services from shopping to prompt after-sale service. My entire audience, whether it be blog readers or social media followers, are all digitally active people.

At any point in your journey were you stuck with self-doubt?

Sustainability is the primary concern when you start any business. The first two years are usually difficult because you end up questioning yourself every single day if you are moving in the right direction. But with consistent hard work and professionalism, success is guaranteed. Having faith in yourself is just as important, as having enough savings to be able to invest in your business until the returns begin to show up.

What have been your greatest challenges in your entrepreneurship journey?

My greatest challenge so far has been dealing with brand arrogance. The brands that reflect high status and quality are usually the hardest to work with. Even with thousands of readers, this prolongs the relationship-building process and developing dream niche at the speed, you may want to.

As a woman entrepreneur would you say you have faced discrimination in your journey? 

I think all women entrepreneurs struggle with an inadequate support system when they start. In a world filled with stereotypes, getting access to financial support is one of the primary challenges. I had to work my way up the patriarchal foundation while facing discrimination. In the masculine world, policies are still favourable for men. However, strategies irradiating investment decisions are now gaining popularity with a focus to eradicate gender disparity.

Network with other women entrepreneurs and let everyone know what you’re doing. To become a successful entrepreneur – have concrete goals, identify your audience, add value and be very professional and assertive.

What do you think women entrepreneurs need more of, from venture capitalists, government policy makers, start up support programmes and others?

Over the last decade, the entrepreneurial ecosystem in India is majorly dominated by men. Even with entrepreneurial ambitions, it is often more difficult for women to succeed. To empower women entrepreneurs, the venture capitalists, government policymakers and start-up support programmes must offer uncomplicated access to finance and networks, as well as, sufficient safety. We must feel positive about the whole experience.

What would you say have been your greatest learning on the entrepreneurial journey?

I’d say the best business lesson I have learned so far is that innovation can be simple. Connecting with brands and audience is not as complicated as it may appear. You just need to make time to serve others. The best way to go about it is, trying and testing different variations before concluding what works best for you. I would recommend short-term adaption with long-term planning. Also, entrepreneurship is difficult and you must put in long work hours to succeed and be ahead of the competition.

What advice would you give to other women looking to become entrepreneurs? 

Network with other women entrepreneurs and let everyone know what you’re doing. To become a successful entrepreneur – have concrete goals, identify your audience, add value and be very professional and assertive. Never doubt yourself or be afraid of approaching a less-explored path. Your business is your baby, your life, so treat it like one.

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