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Five Benefits Of Procrastination That You May Not Know

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Procrastination has a bad reputation. Almost all of us are guilty of being procrastinators at some point in our lives. We put off tasks, and we hate ourselves for doing so. However, can procrastination have any benefits? Or is it truly the monster we make it out to be?

What Is Procrastination?

Procrastination is the intentional delay in starting or finishing a task, despite being aware of the negative consequences it may incur. Usually, when you procrastinate, you find yourself doing trivial activities instead of the task that you are supposed to. For example, you might find yourself cleaning your room to avoid writing an assignment. People who procrastinate also often find themselves working at the last-minute, and rushing to meet deadlines. The stress and panic that procrastination causes gives it a bad reputation. However, there are also some surprising benefits to procrastination.

Procrastination is the intentional delay in starting or finishing a task, despite being aware of the negative consequences it may incur.

Procrastination May Boost Creativity

While you are putting off a task, your subconscious may be still thinking of it. This can lead to an innovative or creative idea or a new way of doing your work. Delaying your work can mean you have more time to think about a creative way of doing it. It can also give you a more efficient solution. When you finally get to down to do the task, it is only after your subconscious has had the time to mull over it.

Also Read: Eight Effective Ways To Keep Yourself Productive 

You Can Avoid Unnecessary Effort

In today’s changing times, nothing is constant. A task you were assigned might not have to be carried out, eventually. If you jump on every task as soon as it comes, you might find yourself doing things that didn’t have to be done. The feeling of working hard on something only to be told that it isn’t needed is heart-wrenching. Waiting for a while means that when you do work, every bit counts.

You Can Enjoy Things You Like

Spending an entire week over a task while giving yourself no time to relax is one way to work. If you’re a procrastinator, though, you probably finished it in one day. What this means is that you have more time to do things you like to. Ultimately, if you had fun and finished your work as well, that’s what matters. So if you’re hanging out with your friends all day, but still finishing your project in the evening and sending it in by the deadline, then you get the best of both worlds.

The feeling of working hard on something only to be told that it isn’t needed is heart-wrenching. Waiting for a while means that when you do work, every bit counts.

Procrastination Can Lead To Prioritisation

When you’re procrastinating, it gives you the time to prioritise. Many people are unable to prioritize but as a procrastinator, you must. Prioritisation is an essential skill that helps you focus on what’s most important and work from there. This is helpful to get rid of unnecessary tasks, things you might have begun that weren’t worth your time, at least now. You can feel more productive this way.

Also Read: Five Ways To Avoid Burnout Yet Stay Productive 

It Gives You An Energy Boost

When you procrastinate, it is usually on a tedious or boring task. You don’t have the energy or the bandwidth for it. However, a looming deadline brings with it a boost of energy. Procrastination’s (or rather a deadline’s) natural consequence is heightened adrenaline as it comes down to the last minute to get the work done. Adrenaline is known to increase focus and makes boring tasks tolerable too.

Photo by Tran Mau Tri Tam on Unsplash

Prapti is an intern at SheThePeople.TV