Diwali is celebrated all over the country and is a festival marked by its various traditions. The Diwali traditions include an annual cleaning of the house, bursting of crackers, and exchanging sweets. However, in recent times, Diwali traditions have undergone several modifications. In our ever-changing world, Diwali traditions are constantly being updated and modernized. While our traditional roots remain intact, the way we express them has certainly changed. Here are five ways in which modern families are improvising on Diwali traditions of the past.

Eco-Conscious Diwali Traditions

A large part of Diwali traditions has always been about lighting diyas and bursting crackers. Families get together in the evening with their children to burst a variety of crackers. However, with the changing times, people are opting out of the tradition of bursting firecrackers. Today’s generation is far more aware of the harm that firecrackers cause to the environment. The idea of ‘green crackers’ or eco-friendly firecrackers, that have come in after the Supreme Court ban on crackers, is fast catching up.

Today’s generation is far more aware of the harm that firecrackers cause to the environment. The idea of ‘green crackers’ or eco-friendly firecrackers, that have come in after the Supreme Court ban on crackers, is fast catching up.

No More Diyas

Today, people are far busier than before. They value convenience over everything else. As a result, there has been a large shift from mud lamps and diyas to electric lamps and fairy lights. The reasons are aplenty: mud lamps with oil and wick are often unsafe, especially with children in the house. Not only are electric lamps safer but they are also hassle-free. Decorative lights come in an innumerable variety, and people often prefer to use them because of their ease of usage and convenience.

READ ALSO: This Diwali, Let Us Find What We’ve Lost In Search Of Convenience

Diwali Greetings

Exchanging sweets or mithai has always been one of the most important Diwali traditions. While in the past, women used to make these sweets by themselves, we prefer to buy sweets now instead, mainly because it is convenient. More importantly, cakes, brownies, cookies and chocolates have replaced the traditional Indian mithai.  They not only have a longer shelf life but also look more appealing with attractive packaging and presentation.

The tradition of visiting people the day after the festival with gifts has long become redundant. People hardly have time and more often than not, they have to go back to work on the day after. In a technology-driven era like ours, Diwali wishes are exchanged on Whatsapp instead. Pictures and videos flood our inboxes as digital greetings replace the tradition of going to someone’s house to wish them a happy Diwali.

The tradition of visiting people the day after the festival with gifts has long become redundant. People hardly have time and more often than not, they have to go back to work on the day after.

Different Decluttering

The cleaning of our houses is very much a Diwali tradition. People used to get together with the entire family to make the house look spick and span. However, today, we are far less likely to clean our houses by ourselves. Cleaning services offered by apps have made the job much easier and faster. Not only do we clean our houses but also ‘detox‘ our bodies and minds. During Diwali, spas and retreat centers also scramble to offer wellness discounts.

Rangolis Without Rang

One very cherished Diwali tradition was always making of the rangoli. As a result of lack of time, and also for the love of convenience, rangolis are almost obsolete in several households.  They’ve been replaced by sticker rangolis. The flowers or the coloured powders are considered a hassle and ready-made stickers are found easily in the market as an alternative.

READ ALSO: A Healthy And Safe Diwali 

Prapti is an intern at SheThePeople.TV. The views expressed are the author’s own.

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