The age of body positivity is here. Women all over the world are embracing their bodies as they are, and learning to love them all over again. There are a lot of people driving this change, especially on social media. Instagram is one of the best places to find bold, unapologetic women who love their bodies. A recent campaign that caught our eye was the 1001 Fesses project.

Fesses in french means ‘bum’. The artists behind the project are going to be photographing 1001 bare bums around the world to show women that every bum is different, beautiful, special and unique.

The campaign was started by Emilie Mercier and Frédérique Marseille, the two best friends from Montreal, Canada, who said in an interview that their project is “an ode… expressing the beauty of ALL our bums.”

In a world where women are always comparing their bodies, and have low self-esteem issues because of their bodies, this campaign comes as a fresh breeze.

Due to the pressure that movies, popular culture, magazines put on women, they find it very hard to love their own selves and their own bodies, and this campaign wants to change that notion. Most women are always critical about the way that their backside looks.

Emilie and Frédérique want women to embrace their flaws and love their bums for what they are. They say that women should love their bums because they are soft, sensual and beautiful. The founders of the campaign also said that they started it in order to desexualise women’s bodies, “It’s not as aggressive as a full frontal picture or other female parts that are obviously sexual, the goal was to desexualise the female body and just show its authenticity outside of a sexual aspect.”

Their photographs never show any of the model’s faces and are completely anonymous. The project was started in 2015 as a crowdfunding project, but now they get plenty of women who want to model for them. They operate through their Facebook and Instagram pages and went viral because of the same.

Pic credits: @1001fesses_project / Instagram

Also read: Go back to eating like our grandparents did, say founders of Slurrp Farm for kids
Read more stories by Nikhita Sanotra